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Author Topic: CONFUSED ABOUT METHODS  (Read 6188 times)
ALEKO
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« on: November 07, 2006, 11:02:18 PM »

HELLO EVERYONE. I NEED HELP ON THIS MATTER. I HAVE 10 CRACKS IN MY BASEMENT 2 OF WHICH ARE RIGHT IN THE CORNER AND ONE IS HORIZONTAL BETWEEN TWO VERTICAL ONES. THE CRACKS IN THE CORNERS RUN TOP TO BOTTOM AND ARE A FAIR SIZE IN WIDTH UNDER AN 1 INCH. SURISINLY NO LEAKS I HAVE LIVED IN THE HOUSE FOR FOUR YEARS NOW. THE HOUSE IS 25 YEARS OLD. I PREFER TO GET THEM INJECTED JUST TO BE SAFE BUT I HEAR THAT INJECTION WILL NOT WORK ON THESES BIG CRACKS OR SOMEONE SAID I HAVE TO USE EPOXY TO BOND THE STRUCTURE BACK TOGETHER. OTHERS SAY OUTSIDE IS THE ONLY WAY TO EVER SEAL CRACKS.  ALSO OUTSIDE SEALING (WATERPROOFING), DONT YOU THINK IT PREVENTS ICE BUILD UP ON THE FOUNDATION WHAT ACTUALLY PROBABLY CAUSES CRACKS. HOW IS AN INSIDE INJECTION GOING TO PREVENT WATER FROM FREEZING ON THE FOUNDATION AND EXPANDING...WONT OUTSIDE WATERPROOFING DO THAT...SO HELP ME WHAT IS THE BETTER WAY..
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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2006, 12:33:32 PM »

Aleko:

It is important to first determine the cause of the cracking. Is it from normal shrinkage of the concrete after construction, or is it due to foundation settlement. You had stated the cracks are under 1 inch. 1 inch would be considered to be very wide cracks and certainly due to settlement issues. Please post the actual width of the cracks so I can better help you. Measure them in millimeters or fractions of an inch. Give a measurement reading for the bottom of the crack and another for the top of the crack. Also, is there deflection of the wall. If the two surfaces are no longer on the same plane, then the wall has move in.

A note on injection: High pressure polyurethane injection is used to seal cracks all the way through the wall, right to the outside. It is flexible and used in residential projects for shrinkage cracks. Epoxy injection is used to bond the cracked surfaces back together and should not be used as a leakage seal. Both injection measures are used in a stabilized crack. If the foundation is in the process of settlement, the settlement problem should be addressed prior to injection. Crack that are actively moving, are not to be injected with epoxy. Epoxy injection will not stop settlement of a foundation.

If the cracks are indeed very wide and the foundation has not moved for many years, you might find that the exterior sealing of the cracks is the best method. If they are 1/4" wide or less, polyurethane injection is the method of choice, but dig and seal is also an option.

A note on Dig & Seal:  Never use tar to seal a crack. A high quality rubberized material is the only choice. Hydrolic cement will not work and should not be used to fix a crack. If cracks are very wide, you should consult a structural engineer for an opinion on repair.
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ALEKOS
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« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2006, 01:09:23 PM »

thanks for your response. I will send some pics ( if I can fiqure how to ) on the cracks. As for the width of them
the majority of the is definetly under 1/4 " but THE TWO in the back corners of the house  is ( by memory - I at work right now) is about 3/4" but it seems thinner and tighter looking into the crack. As for measuring top to bottom the bottom below thefrost line seems to have been re parged or painted with whie speckle so the cracks halfway down are very minimal. I dont know if the  builder did this 20 yaers ago or the previous owner....was this common to parge ( i believe thats what it is) 20 years ago. I have to send you pictures because words cannot describe this basement.NOTE When i purchased this house the basement was partially finished with no insulation....I beleive to hide this entire disaster.  Wil try and send them out tonite,   once again thanks for your input in this stressful manner
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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2006, 01:25:16 PM »

You can post the pictures here by clicking on the text "Additional Options" below the posting window. Just make sure you size your pictures before you upload, to a reasonable size, or the pictures might fill the entire screen.

Parging has been done for many years on residential walls.
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ALEKO
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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2006, 10:35:05 PM »

Sorry I am not familiar with computers is there an email address i can send the pictures to, i think i can manage to send it that way
« Last Edit: November 08, 2006, 10:39:02 PM by ALEKO » Logged
ALEKO
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« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2006, 12:24:59 PM »

did any one see the pics
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