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Author Topic: Wet spots  (Read 4705 times)
rlang
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« on: June 19, 2006, 01:52:42 PM »

I have a 100 year old home with a basement that has issues with the floor.  The concrete floor is moist in areas.  Mostly around hairline cracks in the cement on the floor but also in areas where it seems as if the concrete has become very brittle.  never do I have a stream of water but just moist concrete where you would  never want to put a cardboard box down.  I also have a few areas where the concrete has bulged or humped out.  I thought this was actually an area where there a was a lot of underground water preasure.  I don' think that is the case through as I have chipped away to the dirt an 3x5 foot area.  The dirt is a little moist but  but by no means a pool of water.  So now I have areas of moist spots and area that needs to now be patched.  Obviously unsure on how to proceed and like anyone would love to find the most affordaable option.  Look forward to any type of advise that can be provided.

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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2006, 11:18:48 PM »

We have encountered this situation a number of times. The most common issue is the lack of a drainage layer of gravel or stone under a sufficient floor. (concrete strength and thichness) Sand under the floor in not suitable in many instances as well because contrary to popular belief, it does not drain nearly as fast as clear stone. In addition, if the "soil" under the floor contains silt, it will hold moisture that will wick upthe floor cracks. Clay will "boil" up over long periods of time because the ground is actually a "plastic". That means that it is always in movement in relation to the pressures applied or the lack of.(i.e. less pressure next to the footings than under the footings.

We have solved this problem by the installation of an interior drain tile coupled with a full covering of airgap membrane over the existing floor. A new 3" min floor is poured over the old. Now you have a dry basement. No vapour transmission as well because you now have a vapour barrier.

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rlang
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« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2006, 08:34:51 AM »

Thanks Rod.  What you are saying makes sense.  I guess I am a little hesitant to install the interior type drain system as I would rather not have the walls covered with what in our area seems to be a hard plastic sheet of some sort.  Also if I did as you suggest I would then loose atleast another 3 inches of head room correct?  I had someone quote it that had the interior systems and they also quoted digging out and replacing the old floor with new.  They were around 11K US.  Thus the reason I am seeing if there is a cheeper solution.  I would love to patch and caulk and then paint.  But from what I have read this will not work.  I have also thought about using a concrete resurfacing mix of some kind but something tells me that probably will not work as well.

Do you have any suggestions for companies to call in the Cleveland Ohio area?

Thanks again!
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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2006, 08:57:46 AM »

I'm sorry, no contacts there yet.

As a side note, remember that the repair you choose will directly be reflected in the resale price of your home. It will save you money in the long run to install a solution that the new buyers and home inspectors would be confident in.

Also, the membrane doesn't need to be extended up the walls. The entire system can be contained under the floor, unless the wall are in bad shape and are actively leaking.

Thanks for posting in the forums.
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