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Author Topic: Sounds like a form tie hole leak.  (Read 6177 times)
gti_speed
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« on: February 03, 2006, 07:59:41 PM »

I just bought a house here in Collingwood and noticed my finished basement carpet was wet during long rain periods and snowmelt.  I have taken down the wall and found the problem.  It actually looks like a pinhole drilled into the concrete (doubt that's actually how it got there?).  I was hoping there was a cheaper solution to getting a professional to come in and fill this tiny hole!  Please help a new homeowner!

Craig
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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2006, 08:26:05 PM »

Sounds like a form tie hole leak. Just route out the hole to a depth of three inches making sure the sides of hole (insides) are fresh concrete. Clean and flush with lots of water. (No dust left inside.)
Get some hydraulic cement at Home Depot or Home Hrdware and pack it full while it is still damp inside. Make the cement like a stiff puddy. Should work fine. I did one today at a nice ladies house in Barrie, ON. :-)
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gti_speed
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2006, 09:17:11 PM »

Thanks Rod.  What would the best tool to be to route that out, a concrete drill?  Or should I use something else?
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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2006, 12:45:53 AM »

We use a Dewalt hammer drill with a 1/2 inch diameter SDS Plus bit. (Simply put, a "hammer drill") :-)
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gti_speed
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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2006, 09:27:59 PM »

I'll try that out and let you know how it worked.  I will add pictures too!
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gti_speed
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2007, 08:31:39 PM »

Well, one year later and your advice has kept water out of that location, but it is now leaking out of a crack on the other wall! I will probably need more help on this one... Would it be cheaper to have you come out and fix more than one crack (there are a couple cracks which I am sure will leak in the future) or to fix only the one that is leaking. I will try to get some pictures too.
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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2007, 10:02:53 PM »

Well, the number of cracks you fix will depend on your degree of comfort with future leaks.

There is a price break for additional crack repairs. In the Barrie area, we charge $450 for the first one and $300 for each additional. If there are more than 4, we can drop down to $275 for each additional after the 4.
 Great to hear your fix work for you.
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