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Author Topic: Post your questions here.  (Read 6292 times)
Rod Johnson
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« on: January 26, 2006, 01:43:54 AM »

 :-)
« Last Edit: January 26, 2006, 02:00:49 AM by Rod Johnson » Logged
Irwin
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2007, 04:26:48 PM »

Our home is 40 years old (3 level split, with crawl space, attached garage, 3 bedrooms).  Over the past six (+/-) years, we have noticed a heaving in the floor which has raised approximately 2 to 3 inches.  The room is approximately 13' x 18' and the builder installed hardwood parque flooring directly on the poured concrete floor.  We have been told by one contractor that the whole floor will have to be removed and he believes that the problem could either be a leak in the drain pipe or tree roots.  We have not gotten an idea of how much this would be to repair.  We were told that it was very important to have repairs done and that it would be expensive.  We are retired and therefore have limited resources.  Any ideas of how much we are looking at?  We plan to get at least several estimates, but have no idea what we should be looking for and how to judge if we are 'getting the straight goods'. 
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Rod Johnson
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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2007, 05:07:37 PM »

I think you should first get an engineers assement of the situation. This will give you an accredited opinion of the cause and possible methods of repair. You may need to remove a section of the concrete floor to make sure you know what is happening.
Could be clay expansion, tree roots or that the house is sinking evenly and the floor is not. (I have seen this several times.)
Once you have the engineers report, you can shop for a contractor and not be mislead by a well intentioned but ill informed contractor.
You need the report before you can get a price.
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novice2007
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« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2007, 11:06:14 PM »

I am in the process of building our "dream home", my contractor is reputable but we are not off to a good start.  While my contractor was away, the basement was poured by his sub contractors (in cold weather I may add.. I have been assured that this will not be a problem).  Anyways, we wanted a slab on grade hydronic radiant floor in the basement.  The water tubing unfortunately was neglected to be installed before the pour.  Upon my contractors return I informed him that this was not done.  After he got over the shock, he suggested that a radiant floor could still be installed using a thin slab system (over the basement concrete floor) and that this is done is many commerical settings. He also stated that insulation over the originally poured concrete would not be needed as concrete has the same R rating as insulation). Our contractor is confident it will not pose a height problem (original plan called for a 8 ft ceiling in basement).  I am concerned that this system will not be as efficient as a slab on grade system.  I was also wondering about his point with respect to insulation not being needed? Will I still be able to have the thin slab concrete (levelling compound) coloured, etched, and polished to a nice finish as we inteneded to do with the slab on system?  Are there any other drawbacks / advantages to the thin slab system as compared to the on slabe on grade system? We are just starting our project and have a long way to go..is it worth getting into a huge disagreement about this mistake?   
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sally0077
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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2008, 08:55:52 PM »

Can anyone give me some advice on how to determine if my foundation is rubblestone and how to go about getting some help with what products can be used to waterproof?
 I have a Victorian Home that was built in 1920.  Also, is there any problem with insulating and drywalling a rubblestone foundation?
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